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The sun shines through the ruins of an old house, destroyed during the 1990s civil war, where children play a game of football.
  • A burqa clad woman travelling by donkey beside the Mazar Highway
    Men and boys eat at a stall in the busy Central Market.
    The sun shines through the ruins of an old house, destroyed during the 1990s civil war, where children play a game of football.

    The sun shines through the ruins of an old house, destroyed during the 1990s civil war, where children play a game of football.

    A group of men in a tea shop in Kabul's old city.
    Smoking chimneys rise behind a group of men working at a brick factory outside Herat.
    A husband and wife pictured in Maslakh Refugee Camp. Located approximately 20km from Herat in remote western Afghanistan the camp was once the largest in the country holding an estimated 350, 000 people.
    A man with mental health illness sits on a window sill in a mental health institution.
    Refugees pray in the courtyard of a mosque at the Maslakh Refugee Camp.
    A baby, covered by a netting to protect her from flies, sleeps at a refugee camp for internally displaced people.
    Youths smoke hashish openly in public.
    Men and boys bathe in the hot room in a hammam on a Friday after prayers
    The 22 year old groom smiles while he sits among his male relatives and enjoys the celebrations on his wedding day.
    Women and children sort wool in a fur and wool factory that produce's coats, jackets, hats and other garments for the European and North American markets. More than 350 female and 300 male workers sort wool by tearing pieces of goat's and sheep's wool, which usually contain harmful bacteria, without protective gloves or masks. A lung and chest diseases specialist, at the Herat City Hospital, says workers in fur and wool factories are vulnerable to virulent microbes, which harm the respiratory system and cause chest infections.
    A group of young boys sit on the floor in an orphanage's bare room and watch television.
    A man comforts one of two men injured during a Taliban attack, that they claimed was in revenge for the killing of Osama bin Laden, as they are treated at Mirvays Hospital.
    Two women prisoners in a cell at Herat Prison. They have both been accused of murdering their abusive husbands. Herat's prison has about 1,700 inmates, of whom, residing in a separate facility, over 100 are women.
    Burqa-clad women walk against the wind during a sandstorm blowing through central Kabul.
    Mental health patients lie on the floor, wrapped in blankets and chained together.
    A group of men at Maslakh Refugee Camp. Located approximately 20km from Herat in remote western Afghanistan the camp was once the largest in the country holding an estimated 350, 000 people.
    A vendor sits with his pigeons which he sells in a bird market in the old part of Kabul.
    A hawker, without wares, sits on his cart.
    Sparks fly from beneath a huge pot of food during cooking for wedding celebration.
    A man self-flagellates with sharpened blades during Ashura, the last day of Muharram. Ashura is observed by Shi'a (Shiite) Muslims at the end of a period of mourning for the martyrdom of Hussein ibn Ali, the grandson of the Muhammad who died at the Battle of Karbala (680 CE). Grand processions, religious sermons, charity work and most notably, self-flagellation and displays of intense grief, are all traditions of Ashura.
    A man with one leg walks with the aid of crutches along a dusty road.
    A child cries out as he is punished at a religious school by a man who has tied the boy to a stick.
    A boy and a girl fly up into the air as they ride on the swings in a children's playground.
    People relax on the shore of Lake Karga.
    A horse and rider exercise on Nader Khan Hill the day before an important game of Buzkashi, Afghanistan's national sport. Literally translated as 'goat grabbing', it is played by two teams of men on horseback. They battle for control of a headless goat carcass the objective being getting it into a scoring circle. The game is said to date from the days of Genghis Khan, and remained popular despite being declared un-Islamic by the Taliban.